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Electronic Dance Music

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Electronic dance music (also known as EDMdance musicclub music, or simply dance) is a broad range of percussiveelectronic music genres produced largely for nightclubsraves, and festivalsProduced for playback by disc jockeys (DJs), EDM is generally used in the context of a live mix, where a DJ creates a seamless selection of tracks by segueing from one recording to the next.

By the early 2010s the term "electronic dance music" and the initialism "EDM" was being pushed by the U.S. music industry andmusic press in what was largely an effort to re-brand U.S. rave culture. In the UK, "dance music" or "dance" are more common terms for EDM. In this context, EDM does not refer to a specific genre, but serves as an umbrella term for several commercially-popular genres, including technohousetrancehardstyledrum and bassdubsteptrapJersey club and their respective subgenres.

source: wikipedia

 

Euro disco

Main article: Euro disco
 
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Donna Summer's "I Feel Love" (1977), produced by Giorgio Moroder, was a seminal Euro disco song.

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During the late 1970s the popularity of disco music sharply declined in the United States, abandoned by major U.S. record labels and producers, European disco continued evolving within the broad mainstream pop music scene.[9] European actsSilver ConventionLove and Kisses, Munich Machine, and American acts Donna Summer and the Village People, were acts that defined the late 1970s Euro disco sound. In 1977, Giorgio Moroder and Pete Bellotte produced "I Feel Love" for Donna Summer. It became the first well-known disco hit to have a completely synthesised backing track. Other disco producers, most famously Tom Moulton, grabbed ideas and techniques from dub music (which came with the increased Jamaican migration to New York City in the seventies) to provide alternatives to the four on the floor style that dominated.

 

House music

In the early 1980s, Chicago radio jocks The Hot Mix 5, and club DJs Ron Hardy and Frankie Knuckles played various styles of dance music, including older disco records (mostlyPhilly disco and Salsoul tracks), electro funk tracks by artists such as Afrika Bambaataa, newer Italo discoB-Boy hip hop music by Man ParrishJellybean BenitezArthur Baker, and John Robie, and electronic pop music by Kraftwerk and Yellow Magic Orchestra. Some made and played their own edits of their favorite songs on reel-to-reel tape, and sometimes mixed in effects, drum machines, and other rhythmic electronic instrumentation. The hypnotic electronic dance song "On and On", produced in 1984 by Chicago DJ Jesse Saunders and co-written by Vince Lawrence, had elements that became staples of the early house sound, such as the Roland TB-303 bass synthesizer and minimal vocals as well as a Roland (specifically TR-808drum machine and Korg (specifically Poly-61synthesizer. It also utilized the bassline from Player One's disco record "Space Invaders" (1979).

 
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"Can You Feel It?" (1986) by Mr. Fingers(Larry Heard). It was a seminal deep house track.

 
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Phuture's "Acid Tracks" (1987) is often regarded as the 'first' acid house record.

 
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"Strings of Life" (1987) by Rhythim is Rhythim (Derrick May) was a seminalDetroit techno track.

 
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"Techno Music" by Juan Atkins was the title track of Techno! The New Dance Sound of Detroit (1988).

 
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The album also included "Big Fun" (1988) by Inner City (Kevin Saundersonand Paris Grey), a track that achieved significant commercial success as a single release in fall 1988.[16]

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"On and On" is sometimes cited as the 'first house record', though other examples from around that time, such as J.M. Silk's "Music is the Key" (1985), have also been cited.[19] House music quickly spread to other American cities such as Detroit, New York City, and Newark – all of which developed their own regional scenes. In the mid-to-late 1980s, house music became popular in Europe as well as major cities in South America, and Australia. Chicago House experienced some commercial success in Europe with releases such as "House Nation" by House Master Boyz and the Rude Boy of House (1987). Following this, a number House inspired UK releases such as "Pump Up The Volume" by MARRS (1987), "Theme from S'Express" byS'Express (1988) and "Doctorin' the House" by Coldcut (1988) entered the pop charts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Acid house, techno, and rave

 
Roland TB-303: The bass line synthesizer that was used prominently in acid house.

By 1988, house music had become the most popular form of club music in Europe, withacid house developing as a notable trend in the UK and Germany in the same year.[21] In the UK an established warehouse party subculture, centered on the British African-Caribbean sound system scene fueled underground after-parties that featured dance music exclusively. Also in 1988, the Balearic party vibe associated with Ibiza-based DJAlfredo Fiorito was transported to London, when Danny Rampling and Paul Oakenfoldopened the clubs Shoom and Spectrum, respectively. Both places became synonymous with acid house, and it was during this period that MDMA gained prominence as a party drug. Other important UK clubs included Back to Basics in Leeds, Sheffield's Leadmill and Music Factory, and The Haçienda in Manchester, where Mike Pickering and Graeme Park's spot, Nude, was an important proving ground for American underground dance music. The success of house and acid house paved the way for Detroit Techno, a style that was initially supported by a handful of house music clubs in Chicago, New York, and Northern England, with Detroit clubs catching up later.

One of the first Detroit productions to receive wider attention was Derrick May's "Strings of Life" (1987), which, together with May's previous release, "Nude Photo" (1987), helped raise techno's profile in Europe, especially the UK and Germany, during the 1987-1988 house music boom (see Second Summer of Love). It became May's best known track, which, according to Frankie Knuckles, "just exploded. It was like something you can't imagine, the kind of power and energy people got off that record when it was first heard. Mike Dunn says he has no idea how people can accept a record that doesn't have a bassline." According to British DJ Mark Moore, "Strings of Life" led London clubgoers to accept house: "because most people hated house music and it was all rare groove and hip hop...I'd play 'Strings of Life' at the Mudd Club and clear the floor". By the late 1980s interest in House, Acid house and techno escalated in the club scene and MDMA-fueled clubgoers, who were faced with a 2 a.m. closing time in the UK, started to seek after-hours refuge at all-night warehouse parties. Within a year, in summer 1989, up to 10,000 people at a time were attending commercially organized underground parties called raves.

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